BDSM, Rubber and Vibrators Through History!

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  • March 9, 2017

BDSM, Rubber and Vibrators: These elements of erotic pleasure are, of course, extremely popular today, but what isn’t quite so well-known is the rich, long-standing history which these aspects of arousal enjoy, so here, we’ll take a look through the pages of the past, and chart some of the first stirrings of these sexual revolutions!

Some of the first indications of the existence of a burgeoning BDSM subculture were paintings and illustrations situated within European brothels, around the middle seventeen-hundreds. These pictures depicted scenes of bondage and sadomasochism, alongside erotic literature, and by the early eighteen-hundreds, BDSM – and its many devices – had truly taken hold as an important way to play, some of the most popular accessories being bondage restraints, torture instruments and whips.

The mid-eighteen-hundreds saw a development in the rubber industry, which enabled it to be more pliable and stronger. This was when the development of condoms came into play, (and by the nineteen-thirties, latex had appeared on the market, making things lighter and softer; the development of this new material polarised the sex toy industry, even as it became a staple material.)

Victorian England did have its finger on the pulse when it came to steam power, as it’s here that we see the introduction of the vibrator, butt plugs and dildos. Spas soon popped around all the main cities, offering a civilised approach to masturbation, advertising techniques powered by steam and water jets for vibrational pleasure. They were discreetly termed ‘medicinal waters.”

Victorian Britain wasn’t all that kind to the idea of sexual pleasure derived from using any form of device, which is why they were disguised under the term of ”spas” and ”medicinal” purpose – Although this perspective wasn’t as far-fetched as it may seem, as by the mid eighteen- hundreds, an American doctor had unveiled what was to be known as the world’s first vibrator – to treat women who were thought to be ”hysterical”. Hysteria was a term coined by the Greeks, and meant “suffering uterus” – and this female hysteria would show itself with symptoms such as sexual fantasies, and excessive vaginal lubrication after being stimulated a steam-powered vibrator. If this was the case… which it always was, the treatment was some one-to-one time with the doc, wherein he’d bring the woman to orgasm manually, which would consequently relieve her symptoms… medical fetish anyone?

Women during this period were not to be looked upon as sexual beings, and sex was just for reproduction. Still, not long after this era, the world witnessed the debut of the first electric vibrator. In 1882 this toy was battery-powered and was marketed as a ‘massager” by a British doctor; this device has varying attachments, similar to those which you see today accompanying wand vibrators. This enabled doctors to vary vibrations, to treat the woman’s ”hysteria”.

The roaring twenties saw vibrators being used within the home. These plug-in devices were advertised with a claim that they would “aid relaxation” and “give off a pleasurable throb”! These items were targeted at men, as a way to keep their wives young and hysteria-free! So what are you guys waiting for? Reach for the toybox, and give your wife a treat – after all, it was regarded as “the cure-all”!

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